Getting used to Blender 2.50 Alpha

The image links to a video for Python with Blender 2.5 Alpha 1. I have been playing with it as well as watching videos of UCLA courses. Here is a link to information on the blender API.


On to another subject.

An interesting thing is that though they are so intent on showing how they solved the sequencing of DNA and feel it was extremely elegant and worthy of Nobel prize, these things are relative and when more is understood it seems very strange and indirect. I have the ability to look at atoms with my microscope and so I can simply trace a sequence by looking at it. This technology is not available to them and I have only had it for 9 years now. I am sure they will figure this out eventually, and will they still teach DNA restriction, overlap, cloning and sequencing with fluorescent markers as nostalgia? There are some things that are interesting and though it was innovative in its time, the fact that I had to walk to school in snow above my head to read a book I shared with ten people and it had only ten words in it isn't all that important in the scheme of things. So I can Wiki or Google something and use Blast to figure things out. Do I need to know that some people used to have to dig through 100,000 books at the library a few years ago. Things change and I get tired of hearing how great Frodo or Filbert was to have done this original work as it gets cumbersome when you have to remember 7,000 people who polished the glassware for Pasteur to pass a course. I am still wondering why I even need to remember the Entgegen and Zusammen naming system.

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